What is Data Mining?

Introduction to Contents:


Data mining involves the use of sophisticated data analysis tools to discover previously unknown, valid patterns and relationships in large data sets. These tools can include statistical models, mathematical algorithms, and machine learning methods such as neural networks or decision trees. Consequently, data mining consists of more than collecting and managing data, it also includes analysis and prediction. The objective of data mining is to identify valid, novel, potentially useful, and understandable correlations and patterns in existing data. Finding useful patterns in data is known by different names (e.g., knowledge extraction, information discovery, information harvesting, data archaeology, and data pattern processing).

The term “data mining” is primarily used by statisticians, database researchers, and the business communities. The term KDD (Knowledge Discovery in Databases) refers to the overall process of discovering useful knowledge from data, where data mining is a particular step in this process. The steps in the KDD process, such as data preparation, data selection, data cleaning, and proper interpretation of the results of the data mining process, ensure that useful knowledge is derived from the data. Data mining is an extension of traditional data analysis and statistical approaches as it incorporates analytical techniques drawn from various disciplines like AI, machine learning, OLAP, data visualization, etc.

Data Mining covers variety of techniques to identify nuggets of information or decision-making knowledge in bodies of data, and extracting these in such a way that they can be. Put to use in the areas such as decision support, prediction, forecasting and estimation. The data is often voluminous, but as it stands of low value as no direct use can be made of it; it is the hidden information in the data that is really useful. Data mining encompasses a number of different technical approaches, such as clustering, data summarization, learning classification rules, finding dependency net works, analyzing changes, and detecting anomalies. Data mining is the analysis of data and the use of software techniques for finding patterns and regularities in sets of data. The computer is responsible for finding the patterns by identifying the underlying rules and features in the data. It is possible to ‘strike gold’ in unexpected places as the data mining software extracts patterns not previously discernible or so obvious that no-one has noticed them before. In Data Mining, large volumes of data are sifted in an attempt to find something worthwhile.

  How to Set the Right Goals?

Data mining plays a leading role in the every facet of Business. It is one of the ways by which a company can gain competitive advantage. Through application of Data mining, one can tum large volumes of data collected from various front-end systems like Transaction Processing Systems, ERP, and operational CRM into meaningful knowledge.

“Data mining is the computing process of discovering patterns in large data sets involving methods at the intersection of machine learning, statistics, and database systems. It is an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science. The overall goal of the data mining process is to extract information from a data set and transform it into an understandable structure for further use. Aside from the raw analysis step, it involves database and data management aspects, data pre-processing, model and inference considerations, interestingness metrics, complexity considerations, post-processing of discovered structures, visualization, and online updating. Data mining is the analysis step of the “knowledge discovery in databases” process, or KDD.”

Data Mining History and Current Advances

The process of digging through data to discover hidden connections and predict future trends has a long history. Sometimes referred to as “knowledge discovery in databases,” the term “data mining” wasn’t coined until the 1990s. But its foundation comprises three intertwined scientific disciplines: statistics (the numeric study of data relationships), artificial intelligence (human-like intelligence displayed by software and/or machines) and machine learning (algorithms that can learn from data to make predictions). What was old is new again, as data mining technology keeps evolving to keep pace with the limitless potential of big data and affordable computing power.

  What is Manpower Planning? Example, with Importance!

Over the last decade, advances in processing power and speed have enabled us to move beyond manual, tedious and time-consuming practices to quick, easy and automated data analysis. The more complex the data sets collected, the more potential there is to uncover relevant insights. Retailers, banks, manufacturers, telecommunications providers and insurers, among others, are using data mining to discover relationships among everything from pricing, promotions and demographics to how the economy, risk, competition and social media are affecting their business models, revenues, operations and customer relationships.

Who’s using it?

Data mining is at the heart of analytics efforts across a variety of industries and disciplines.

Communications: In an overloaded market where competition is tight, the answers are often within your consumer data. Multimedia and telecommunications companies can use analytic models to make sense of mountains of customers data, helping them predict customer behavior and offer highly targeted and relevant campaigns.

Insurance: With analytic know-how, insurance companies can solve complex problems concerning fraud, compliance, risk management and customer attrition. Companies have used data mining techniques to price products more effectively across business lines and find new ways to offer competitive products to their existing customer base.

Education: With unified, data-driven views of student progress, educators can predict student performance before they set foot in the classroom – and develop intervention strategies to keep them on course. Data mining helps educators access student data, predict achievement levels and pinpoint students or groups of students in need of extra attention.

Manufacturing: Aligning supply plans with demand forecasts is essential, as is early detection of problems, quality assurance and investment in brand equity. Manufacturers can predict wear of production assets and anticipate maintenance, which can maximize uptime and keep the production line on schedule.

  Definition of Weakness, What is It?

Banking: Automated algorithms help banks understand their customer base as well as the billions of transactions at the heart of the financial system. Data mining helps financial services companies get a better view of market risks, detect fraud faster, manage regulatory compliance obligations and get optimal returns on their marketing investments.

Retail: Large customer databases hold hidden insights that can help you improve customer relationships, optimize marketing campaigns and forecast sales. Through more accurate data models, retail companies can offer more targeted campaigns – and find the offer that makes the biggest impact on the customer.

What-is-Data-Mining


Advertisements
You May Also Like